MPS Helps Businesses Overcome Print Inefficiencies

shutterstock_717112474

Surprising Statistics Involving Business Printing

Since the turn of the century, managed print services or MPS have transformed how businesses handle their documents in terms of productivity, security and efficiency. This is reflected locally with the success area companies have had with printer services in Las Vegas. Nevertheless, there are many improvements left to make as made evident by a recent study conducted within the print industry.

The Average Worker Prints Six Unused Pages a Day

An office worker in the United States prints on average 34 pages a day. Seventeen percent of those pages are never used. In an office with 10 people, that results in about 60 pages a day. If you assume a cost per page of 10 cents—which is common among businesses not using managed print solutions—that equals $6 a day, $30 a week or more than $1,500 a year.

Many Businesses Include Printing in General Office Costs

As high as 90 percent of all business don’t know precisely what printing costs them on an annual basis. Often, this is because small companies include printing in a general office budget, which can often include supplies like coffee, coffee filters, paper clips and rubber bands.

Most Documents Are Recycled the Same Day

More than 65 percent of all printed documents in business environments are recycled—or worse, discarded—the same day that they are created. In order for the paperless office to ever be a reality, companies may need to learn how to have employees favor electronic transmission.

Printing Is a Top 5 Business Expense

Printing is the third highest expense just after payroll and rent. That’s a number that surprises not just businesses but people within the print industry. Print costs often represent 3 percent of annual revenue. That significance is why even small business must put document management into its own category and use the resources available to minimize costs and be more environmentally friendly.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn